All Time Top 1100 Albums - Led Zeppelin (III) - P226

Onholiday(somemightsay)

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4 Aug 2018
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9,702
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MIA
Talking Heads
Remain in Light
2/10

Beth Orton
Central Reservation
4/10

David Crosby
If Only I Could Remember My Name
7/10

Def Leppard
Euphoria
2/10

Beck
Mellow Gold
2/10

Bad Company
Bad Company
6/10

Bob Dylan
Bringing it all back home
6/10

Aretha Franklin
Aretha Now
6/10

Carly Simon
No secrets
3/10

The Beatles
Help!
6/10

Rush
Permanent Waves
5/10

Leonard Cohen
Songs of love and hate
3/10

Crosby Stills & Nash
Crosby Stills & Nash
7/10

Frank Sinatra
Sings for Only the Lonely
5/10

Talk Talk
Spirit of Eden
5/10

Roxy Music
Country Life
3/10

Joe Jackson
Body and Soul
2/10

Madonna
Erotica
2/10

Violent Femmes
Violent Femmes
2/10

Metallica
Metallica (Black?)
6/10

Bob Dylan (Father to love-child @BlueHammer85 )
Love and Theft
4/10

New Score

Derek and the Dominos
Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs
=----------------=---------------=

Contrary to popular opinion, I actually really like Clapton's vocals on Layla - a good effort voice slightly lowered in the pecking order on the track of what is undoubtedly a brilliant song. It's a Great riff and I still enjoy it whenever it's presented.

And just like that, my superlatives are over :-/

Genre of music - tick
Playability - tick
Excitement / breaking new ground / leaving you wanting to hear more - sadly lacking

@RobMCFC has eluded to this already about the output vs the sum of the bands parts and unfortunately he is spot on.

Clapton is an excellent excellent player of the guitar and he also has some good songs in his extensive locker, but overall he flatters to deceive for me. He doesn't excite or provoke emotional response in the same way as a Hendrix or Rory Gallagher et al (I've full named him just in case there was any confusion over the surname ;-) ). The problem he's got is that he's generally held this type of esteem. I find myself liking the idea of Clapton more than actually listening to him.

A lot of the tracks meander and run far too long (yes it's bluesy but the touch paper is never lit throughout the entire album) so I'm basically sat there wondering when Layla is coming on. That's a pretty sad indictment for an album that promises so much more.

This next opinion probably won't go down too well with blues lovers (to a point maybe it shouldn't), Clapton hides himself in plain sight in the blues. He has a comfort zone and he is happy to passively stay there (there are a lot of players who would say they are being true to themselves, that's up for debate) churning out a few blues licks in a different key and a varied tempo.

I pretty much feel that I want a different head on his shoulders and apologies as I haven't even given much thought to the other fine musicians on the album.

Frustratingly BlueMooners, there's nothing bad with the album but it is certainly lacking for me so it's another 4/10.

When's that fucking sunshine coming back.................
 

Bill Walker

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Joined
24 Dec 2006
Messages
20,100
Location
Down under
Talking Heads
Remain in Light
2/10

Beth Orton
Central Reservation
4/10

David Crosby
If Only I Could Remember My Name
7/10

Def Leppard
Euphoria
2/10

Beck
Mellow Gold
2/10

Bad Company
Bad Company
6/10

Bob Dylan
Bringing it all back home
6/10

Aretha Franklin
Aretha Now
6/10

Carly Simon
No secrets
3/10

The Beatles
Help!
6/10

Rush
Permanent Waves
5/10

Leonard Cohen
Songs of love and hate
3/10

Crosby Stills & Nash
Crosby Stills & Nash
7/10

Frank Sinatra
Sings for Only the Lonely
5/10

Talk Talk
Spirit of Eden
5/10

Roxy Music
Country Life
3/10

Joe Jackson
Body and Soul
2/10

Madonna
Erotica
2/10

Violent Femmes
Violent Femmes
2/10

Metallica
Metallica (Black?)
6/10

Bob Dylan (Father to love-child @BlueHammer85 )
Love and Theft
4/10

New Score

Derek and the Dominos
Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs
=----------------=---------------=

Contrary to popular opinion, I actually really like Clapton's vocals on Layla - a good effort voice slightly lowered in the pecking order on the track of what is undoubtedly a brilliant song. It's a Great riff and I still enjoy it whenever it's presented.

And just like that, my superlatives are over :-/

Genre of music - tick
Playability - tick
Excitement / breaking new ground / leaving you wanting to hear more - sadly lacking

@RobMCFC has eluded to this already about the output vs the sum of the bands parts and unfortunately he is spot on.

Clapton is an excellent excellent player of the guitar and he also has some good songs in his extensive locker, but overall he flatters to deceive for me. He doesn't excite or provoke emotional response in the same way as a Hendrix or Rory Gallagher et al (I've full named him just in case there was any confusion over the surname ;-) ). The problem he's got is that he's generally held this type of esteem. I find myself liking the idea of Clapton more than actually listening to him.

A lot of the tracks meander and run far too long (yes it's bluesy but the touch paper is never lit throughout the entire album) so I'm basically sat there wondering when Layla is coming on. That's a pretty sad indictment for an album that promises so much more.

This next opinion probably won't go down too well with blues lovers (to a point maybe it shouldn't), Clapton hides himself in plain sight in the blues. He has a comfort zone and he is happy to passively stay there (there are a lot of players who would say they are being true to themselves, that's up for debate) churning out a few blues licks in a different key and a varied tempo.

I pretty much feel that I want a different head on his shoulders and apologies as I haven't even given much thought to the other fine musicians on the album.

Frustratingly BlueMooners, there's nothing bad with the album but it is certainly lacking for me so it's another 4/10.

When's that fucking sunshine coming back.................
" He doesn't excite or provoke emotional response in the same way as a Hendrix or Rory Gallagher et al"

Thats actually a very valid point. And you brought up a memory of a feeling I had years ago, I watched the Hendrix performance at Woodstock many times about 20 years ago, his performance was mesmerizing, playing all these rhythms, absolute shedload of varying emotions, I remember thinking "here is THE guitar god" Ive never seen it matched and I doubt I ever will.
And then I thought of Clapton, wonderful player, yes, fluid, virtuoso passages in his fine lead Blues guitar passages. I thought "could Clapton have done this, what Jimi did that day at Woodstock" ? The answer is a resounding No !....... Clapton is a virtuoso of the Blues guitar, but he appears too anal, too uptight in his demeanor, too stoic, too white maybe ? ..in the words of Rob he doesnt excite or proke... I just couldnt see him elicit the same gobsmacking genuine emotion from that Stratocaster as Jimi did that day, in front of that massive audience, this guy fucking sleeps with that guitar.
Hendrix was on fire that day, as he was many times in live shows, a joy too watch.
OK, Im a fan of Eric, especially when he played Gibson guitars, which imo suited his playing way better than Strats, way Bluesier with longer sustain and that "woman tone" he was famous for in Cream. or that wonderful attack he got on the John Mayall Beano album.
Anyway Im off to Youtube now to watch Jimi at woodstock, first time in years, where's that Scotch ?
 
Last edited:

GoatersLeftShin

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" He doesn't excite or provoke emotional response in the same way as a Hendrix or Rory Gallagher et al"

Thats actually a very valid point. And you brought up a memory of a feeling I had years ago, I watched the Hendrix performance at Woodstock many times about 20 years ago, his performance was mesmerizing, playing all these rhythms, absolute shedload of varying emotions, I remember thinking "here is THE guitar god" Ive never seen it matched and I doubt I ever will.
And then I thought of Clapton, wonderful player, yes, fluid, virtuoso passages in his fine lead Blues guitar passages. I thought "could Clapton have done this, what Jimi did that day at Woodstock" ? The answer is a resounding No !....... Clapton is a virtuoso of the Blues guitar, but he appears too anal, too uptight in his demeanor, too stoic, too white maybe ? ..in the words of Rob he doesnt excite or proke... I just couldnt see him elicit the same gobsmacking genuine emotion from that Stratocaster as Jimi did that day, in front of that massive audience, this guy fucking sleeps with that guitar.
Hendrix was on fire that day, as he was many times in live shows, a joy too watch.
OK, Im a fan of Eric, especially when he played Gibson guitars, which imo suited his playing way better than Strats, way Bluesier with longer sustain and that "woman tone" he was famous for in Cream.
Anyway Im off to Youtube now to watch Jimi at woodstock, first time in years, where's that Scotch ?
Completely agree Bill. Clapton is a great guitarist, there's no doubt but he's too "clean" in some respects. I think the reason I like Layla more than any other of his songs is that he let's it go.

Hendrix on the other hand is the master. He can let it rip - I think Star Spangled Banner is one of the greatest interpretations of any piece of music ever. Hendrix could mix the blues (Red House), early 'heavy metal' (Voodoo Chile, Purple Haze), psychedelic (Burning of the midnight lamp), love (Little Wing) and smash the SSB effortlessly and give you the feeling there was so much more to give. Not only that, his performances are astonishing. Imagine being at Woodstock!

Without doubt, they are both brilliant guitarists but for me Hendrix was - and is - the one to top.
 

mancity1

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Joined
18 Aug 2005
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11,659
Location
Melbourne
" He doesn't excite or provoke emotional response in the same way as a Hendrix or Rory Gallagher et al"

Thats actually a very valid point. And you brought up a memory of a feeling I had years ago, I watched the Hendrix performance at Woodstock many times about 20 years ago, his performance was mesmerizing, playing all these rhythms, absolute shedload of varying emotions, I remember thinking "here is THE guitar god" Ive never seen it matched and I doubt I ever will.
And then I thought of Clapton, wonderful player, yes, fluid, virtuoso passages in his fine lead Blues guitar passages. I thought "could Clapton have done this, what Jimi did that day at Woodstock" ? The answer is a resounding No !....... Clapton is a virtuoso of the Blues guitar, but he appears too anal, too uptight in his demeanor, too stoic, too white maybe ? ..in the words of Rob he doesnt excite or proke... I just couldnt see him elicit the same gobsmacking genuine emotion from that Stratocaster as Jimi did that day, in front of that massive audience, this guy fucking sleeps with that guitar.
Hendrix was on fire that day, as he was many times in live shows, a joy too watch.
OK, Im a fan of Eric, especially when he played Gibson guitars, which imo suited his playing way better than Strats, way Bluesier with longer sustain and that "woman tone" he was famous for in Cream. or that wonderful attack he got on the John Mayall Beano album.
Anyway Im off to Youtube now to watch Jimi at woodstock, first time in years, where's that Scotch ?
Bill you are a bluddy beauty , by far the best outdoor virtuoso on an instrument I will have the pleasure of watching and listening to in the post 55 music era.

he didn't sleep with it he made love to it ( I would be banned for life if I actually say what I think he actually did to that Strato).
 

Saddleworth2

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Joined
27 Jan 2014
Messages
14,771
Eric Clapton’s always been a bit of a puzzle to me. I’ve never been moved by his music because it seems like an exercise in creating space for him to insert ridiculously great-sounding licks. I suppose if you wanted (and you shouldn't) you could make the same statement about Hendrix or Van Halen, but Jimi moved you vocally -- with his soul -- and Eddie had David Lee Roth to add a touch of the ridiculous (and a hell of a rhythm section). Like Knopfler or Santana, guitar heroes as effectively solo artists can be great (or mediocre) but sometimes they never really progress.

So while a lot of “Layla, etc.” sounds super tasty, at the end you’re kind of left wondering what the message is here. Here are blues with varying tempos and fills, played with incredible skill, but embedded in songs thematically mundane and uninteresting (“love” as a trope, but one you never feel -- with one exception). And two records worth of them at that. Clapton even says these songs were just “something to play” and while that can be loose and freewheeling, there’s no way a guy this obsessive isn’t going to tinker -- a LOT -- in the studio (which he did of course). It doesn’t make it any better that Clapton has brought in Duane Allman to go toe-to-toe with him -- this makes it even more about them and their talent and less about the music and what it says. This record is the absolute poster child for why I find the Allman Brothers dull, and -- as a counterpoint -- Lynyrd Skynyrd catchy and captivating.

And I made a mistake earlier. This record is 50+ years old. As I played it I realized -- I’m an idiot, I’ve heard a ton of this before. Well, “listened to.” “Heard” I’m less sure of.

Having said all that -- wow, the talent. I mean it’s blistering. The hits -- “Layla”, “Bell Bottom Blues”, “Tell The Truth” and the criminally-underrated “Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad?” -- are pretty freaking mesmerizing, and some of the others are wonderful examples of a craftsman working with wood and strings that go beyond mere mortals. “Layla” is titanic, but I agree with those of you who feel it doesn’t quite fit -- maybe because Eric actually emotes (he’s pretty stressed about her, yeah?), or maybe because he just fucking rocks rather than, errr, blues-es. Whether full blazing-speed or just the little fills, everywhere you listen, Clapton is working in oils like Michelangelo. Even when he isn’t, “I Looked Away” and “Anyday” carry the slide guitar and/or that Hammond about as far as they can go in a rock/blues context as opposed to a country or church one, respectively. But then I get bog-standards like “Key To The Highway” and “It’s Too Late” and “Have You Ever Loved A Woman?” (answer: yes) that literally have innovation factors of 0 despite how good they sound, covers or no. On a double record, there needs to be something more -- more chances taken, more to say.

I can handle Clapton’s voice – it’s modest, which means it doesn’t overwhelm the licks, but it also serves to -- once again -- muddy the emotion that songs about love should IMO carry if we want to feel them. This is the counterpoint to early Dylan -- here the music is all, but the poetry is weak, instead of vice versa. Of course, you could argue blues singers always understate. Fair enough, but if I’m down about getting dumped I prefer the solo piano anyway -- or something like "Thorn Tree In The Garden" (theoretically; in practice that tune was more than a bit crap).

I suppose (not suppose -- KNOW) some will find the simplicity of the theme as charming or winning, or sad or beautiful. Lots have, given its ranking among the all-time great records. But I don’t. Sonically, sure -- top-drawer blues played by one of the best ever. Thematically? I already know love can be a bucket of shit -- next, please.

I’m wavering between scores, but in the end . . . well, that “Goodfellas” scene breaks the tie. 6/10.
Thats another great review. It captures spookily what I feel about Clapton. I liked most of what he did with Cream but would prefer to listen to other guitarist such as BB King if I want blues, Rory Gallagher if I want anything including blues. Clapton is so up himself its not true. We saw him 'live' at the RAH, zero relationship with his audience. Of course he is a great guitarist but honestly, I wouldn't cross the road to see him again. Lacks emotion or soul.
 

FogBlueInSanFran

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Thats another great review. It captures spookily what I feel about Clapton. I liked most of what he did with Cream but would prefer to listen to other guitarist such as BB King if I want blues, Rory Gallagher if I want anything including blues. Clapton is so up himself its not true. We saw him 'live' at the RAH, zero relationship with his audience. Of course he is a great guitarist but honestly, I wouldn't cross the road to see him again. Lacks emotion or soul.
That’s harsher than I meant it but the relatability is suspiciously lacking. EVH had the same issue but DLR humanized him and the music (and also explains why Van Halen went to absolute fucking hamster shit — except for “Right Now” — when that dildo Sammy Hagar joined).
 

Onholiday(somemightsay)

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" He doesn't excite or provoke emotional response in the same way as a Hendrix or Rory Gallagher et al"

Thats actually a very valid point. And you brought up a memory of a feeling I had years ago, I watched the Hendrix performance at Woodstock many times about 20 years ago, his performance was mesmerizing, playing all these rhythms, absolute shedload of varying emotions, I remember thinking "here is THE guitar god" Ive never seen it matched and I doubt I ever will.
And then I thought of Clapton, wonderful player, yes, fluid, virtuoso passages in his fine lead Blues guitar passages. I thought "could Clapton have done this, what Jimi did that day at Woodstock" ? The answer is a resounding No !....... Clapton is a virtuoso of the Blues guitar, but he appears too anal, too uptight in his demeanor, too stoic, too white maybe ? ..in the words of Rob he doesnt excite or proke... I just couldnt see him elicit the same gobsmacking genuine emotion from that Stratocaster as Jimi did that day, in front of that massive audience, this guy fucking sleeps with that guitar.
Hendrix was on fire that day, as he was many times in live shows, a joy too watch.
OK, Im a fan of Eric, especially when he played Gibson guitars, which imo suited his playing way better than Strats, way Bluesier with longer sustain and that "woman tone" he was famous for in Cream. or that wonderful attack he got on the John Mayall Beano album.
Anyway Im off to Youtube now to watch Jimi at woodstock, first time in years, where's that Scotch ?
I've read this 3 times today - it's really well put.

In some respects, it's harsh that I compared him to the two guitarists that I did.

So taking favouritism out of it etc, the others have a much better understanding of the instrument and it's capabilities (is probably how I would word it).

On top of that, Rory outworks him on stage about 10-1 - no words required on Jimi.

Even more common ground for us there BW.............. ;-)
 

ted the grass

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I like Clapton....as a player..early works blues in particular. Not the mid late period MOR shmaltz. Lacks a bit of feel though.
For white blues guitarists I go with Peter Green and Johnny Winter...Not Rory G...a fine player but relied far too much on speed and didnt have enough good tunes!...Hendrix again...gotta love him...but that wailing Psychedelic feedback does nothing for me.
 

BlueHammer85

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Cheers Blues! Apologies for being a day late - was at a Wedding all day yesterday.
Another poor turn out this week - Just 11 votes , was 22 votes a couples weeks ago!

Impressive score for Clapton's 'Derek and the Dominos' despite a few never hearing this before


Derek And The Dominos / Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs
11 Votes
Average Score = 6.8


new album review tomorrow.
Updated table on Page 1



Next up.. we head to the 1980's for our first live Album to review.

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FogBlueInSanFran

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Cheers Blues! Apologies for being a day late - was at a Wedding all day yesterday.
Another poor turn out this week - Just 11 votes , was 22 votes a couples weeks ago!

Impressive score for Clapton's 'Derek and the Dominos' despite a few never hearing this before


Derek And The Dominos / Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs
11 Votes
Average Score = 6.8


new album review tomorrow.
Updated table on Page 1



Next up.. we head to the 1980's for our first live Album to review.

View attachment 28424
Well, that doesn't narrow it down much ya bastard!! Unless there's a clue in terms of the interior above. Thought maybe Depeche Mode but I think that was a 90s record.
 

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