All Time Top 1100 Albums

mancity1

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Based on my earlier remarks and looking at the fact that Bill Walker whose musical tastes and knowledge of music I admire a lot has in a nutshell summarised my thoughts in the main although clearly Layla is not on my list of Eric's best work Ocean Boulevard is clearly for me head and shoulders above anything he has done solo so to speak all thing s considered a 6/10.

As Bill alludes to too many covers and for me the covers are the best tracks on the album.
 

Bill Walker

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If anyone wants to purchase Layla it now comes in a new half-speed remastered form to mark its 50th anniversary, the story of Derek And The Dominos’ debut album Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs keeps on growing with every incarnation.
As a reissue project, its obviously not in unchartered waters here. There have already been at least seven separate reboots of the album on CD including 1990’s The Layla Sessions: 20th Anniversary Edition, which expanded it to a 3CD set complete with two extra discs of unused, alternate and incomplete masters of the original songs plus studio jamming. A 40th anniversary deluxe edition in 2021 also rifled extensively through the album’s store cupboard.
Having said that, Layla… is less well served on vinyl and this latest 4LP boxset tangibly has the edge on its predecessors. It’s always been a dense sonic mix – the album’s multi-tracked guitars the obvious highlight – and this new version by Miles Showell at Abbey Road brings the most clarity to date to its individual instrumentation. This new boxset also includes a 12×12” book of sleevenotes taken from the 40th anniversary edition.

For this incarnation, we have the original album, outtakes from the original sessions, performances on Johnny Cash’s TV show from 5 November 1970, their Phil Spector-helmed debut single and April/May 1971 works-in-progress for an aborted second album with producer Andy Johns.

Im actually thinking of getting this. :)
 

arfurclue

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Put this on whilst doing this and that, with the idea of giving it a first crack. Seems like standard fare in general. Though Layla is a classic track. But what I want to write about is the song whose lyrics I misheard, whose title i then ridiculously misread. ‘Keep on growing’ had become ‘Keep on rolling.’ Yet this was an apt decription of what I was experiencing. One of those tunes where there is a palpable sense of waves of sound rolling - of energetic shapes playing and dancing within. One of those times when it feels like folk have stopped trying to be musicians and just let the music flow instead. Jammin‘ in joyous celebration and communion. Literally stopped what else I was doing - an involuntary foot tapping, smile cracking listen. ‘This,’ for me, is a beautiful example of what music is capable of evoking. And then back to ‘as before.‘ Through this song and that. Layla appeared, then left. Eventually got to the point where i was thinking that the album was getting a bit long and tiresome, but just as the last track was coming to a finish, so not such bad timing. Overall, it’s ok and would give it a 5.5, though don’t much feel to give it another listen - but then with Keep on growing and Layla, I’d add another point…and a half, so that makes 7.
 

Onholiday(somemightsay)

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Put this on whilst doing this and that, with the idea of giving it a first crack. Seems like standard fare in general. Though Layla is a classic track. But what I want to write about is the song whose lyrics I misheard, whose title i then ridiculously misread. ‘Keep on growing’ had become ‘Keep on rolling.’ Yet this was an apt decription of what I was experiencing. One of those tunes where there is a palpable sense of waves of sound rolling - of energetic shapes playing and dancing within. One of those times when it feels like folk have stopped trying to be musicians and just let the music flow instead. Jammin‘ in joyous celebration and communion. Literally stopped what else I was doing - an involuntary foot tapping, smile cracking listen. ‘This,’ for me, is a beautiful example of what music is capable of evoking. And then back to ‘as before.‘ Through this song and that. Layla appeared, then left. Eventually got to the point where i was thinking that the album was getting a bit long and tiresome, but just as the last track was coming to a finish, so not such bad timing. Overall, it’s ok and would give it a 5.5, though don’t much feel to give it another listen - but then with Keep on growing and Layla, I’d add another point…and a half, so that makes 7.
Absolutely brilliantly worded this bit - I wouldn't have been able to quantify in words and yet I know exactly what you mean.

Bravo.............
 

GoatersLeftShin

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I'd obviously heard Layla many times, but I'd never heard the album before. I've no idea why, but I think I assumed that the band were a one hit wonder for Clapton to play in!

I remember the unplugged session he did in the 90s and remember No one knows.you when you're down and out. I love that song and really liked the slow version on the album.

I didn't really know what to expect from the album though, I just assumed it would be songs in a similar style to Layla, but it feels like Layla is really the odd one out! I didn't like the Little Wing cover at all, and as I will say many times there's some songs you can't cover. Little Wing is one.

I am a big fan of 70s classic rock and this is a great example of it, obviously more blues orientated. Clapton is a great guitarist and he's surrounded himself with superb musicians. My only criticism, like others have said, was there was too many covers and maybe the album is one track too long for me. Of course, Layla is the standout track and I'm not sure who said it (might be @Bill Walker ) but I'd also love to hear it sung by someone else. It's something I'd never thought about before!

Overall, this is a solid blues rock album. I've found another album from this thread that I'll definitely listen to again! Ive really enjoyed listening to albums I've not heard before so thanks again @BlueHammer85

7/10
 

BimboBob

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Listen, Can you smell something?
Having listened to this album a few times today...in the car on the way to the football, in the car on the way back from the football, at home after the football I can now give you my score.

It's a rather lovely bluesy record. I'm not bothered by the covers for they are done well, with style, with panache and with love. You can feel the love in every instrument. Every note. In every voice. It's all mellow and rather lovely.

And then...

Quite what Layla was doing in here is anyone's business as it doesn't fit. At all. Someone will probably tell me that I'm missing the obvious but it's a brash song in a sea of mellowness. Sure, it's got one of the most famous guitar riffs in the world (tm) but it does stand out like a sore thing next to your fingers.

7/10
 

Bill Walker

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Put this on whilst doing this and that, with the idea of giving it a first crack. Seems like standard fare in general. Though Layla is a classic track. But what I want to write about is the song whose lyrics I misheard, whose title i then ridiculously misread. ‘Keep on growing’ had become ‘Keep on rolling.’ Yet this was an apt decription of what I was experiencing. One of those tunes where there is a palpable sense of waves of sound rolling - of energetic shapes playing and dancing within. One of those times when it feels like folk have stopped trying to be musicians and just let the music flow instead. Jammin‘ in joyous celebration and communion. Literally stopped what else I was doing - an involuntary foot tapping, smile cracking listen. ‘This,’ for me, is a beautiful example of what music is capable of evoking. And then back to ‘as before.‘ Through this song and that. Layla appeared, then left. Eventually got to the point where i was thinking that the album was getting a bit long and tiresome, but just as the last track was coming to a finish, so not such bad timing. Overall, it’s ok and would give it a 5.5, though don’t much feel to give it another listen - but then with Keep on growing and Layla, I’d add another point…and a half, so that makes 7.
Yes, well said, I know what you mean very very well, I try to explain sometimes to people that this is what Jazz does to me, as did Progressive Rock. But Jazz is all about improvisation, you play the main theme of the song and then away you fly to improvise land, somewhere else, into the void, into the sky....the listener hopefully flies away with the musicians, another world and a complete other worldy experience, like an acid trip, your mind leaves your body behind....Catatonia haha. It transcends the mind.
It feels vaguely familiar to countless other moments in your life where you were absorbed in a zone, lost in thought, enthralled by bliss, or perhaps simply zoned out of the everyday...meditating.
Theres been times when my wife has asked me a question and I dont really hear her, I think she knows when not to ask!
But the musicianship has to be first rate, like a John Coltrane Sax solo, like Hendrix at Woodstock, he could do things on his Sax that you didnt think were possible, as could Jimi on his Strat.
But this is the power of music. What I would have given to be a part of something like this.
But as I listen, maybe I am part of it.
Anyway please forgive my ramblings, I think I could talk about music all day long :)
 
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crublue1

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Yes, well said, I know what you mean very very well, I try to explain sometimes to people that this is what Jazz does to me, as did Progressive Rock. But Jazz is all about improvisation, you play the main theme of the song and away you fly, somewhere else, into the void, into the sky....the listener hopefully flies away with the musicians, another world and a complete other worldy experience, like an acid trip, your mind leaves your body behind....Catatonia haha. It transcends the mind.
It feels vaguely familiar to countless other moments in your life where you were absorbed in a zone, lost in thought, enthralled by bliss, or perhaps simply zoned out of the everyday...meditating.
Theres been times when my wife has asked me a question and I dont really hear her, I think she knows when not to ask!
But the musicianship has to be first rate, like a John Coltrane Sax solo, like Hendrix at Woodstock, he could do things on his Sax that you didnt think were possible.
But this is the power of music. What I would have given to be a part of something like this.
But as I listen, maybe I am part of it.
Anyway please forgive my ramblings, I think I could talk about music all day long :)
That was a lovely piece of writing Bill, from the heart.

wow, it felt like we were in the same room sharing a scotch or 2 chewing the fat and putting the world to right.
A pleasure to read that.
 

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