Daughter wants to be a Personal Trainer - any advice?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by somapop, 20 May 2020.

  1. Bigg Bigg Blue

    Bigg Bigg Blue

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    I don't know a lot about stuff like this but I say good luck to her, if she enjoys it ,why not.
     
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  2. PannickAtTheDisco

    PannickAtTheDisco

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    Maybe she can carve out a niche and target helping others with similar conditions and create a network/group.
     
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  3. somapop

    somapop

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    Thanks - definitely an option.
     

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  4. Vicious111

    Vicious111

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    I do quite alot of freelance design and Marketing work for a few very good PT's that I know. The industry, especially in the urban areas, can be very competitive and I have seen more than a few give up on it and move into a different career.

    The Marketing and Sales side of being a PT is very important as it makes you stand out. Using Glasgow as an example, PT's rely on an excellent reputation, and if your just starting out then that reputation needs to be built. This is where investment Marketing such as targeted video advertising on platforms such as Instagram come in.

    With your daughters autism, I think that could be her niche however. Personally I have never heard of autism friendly PT training. Could she look to target other autistic people and parents who are looking to get their kids into fitness and lifting? I imagine there are many autistic people who are fearful of large, busy gyms and having someone who knows what it's shared the same fears would be very appealing? Someone also mentioned her lifeguard badge which would add yet another avenue for her. By concentrating in offering autism friendly training, this could help her stand out from other PT's and also probably help both her and her future clients get into Lifting.
     
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  5. quiet_riot

    quiet_riot

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    Honestly, and I say this with no malice intended, I think an autistic powerlifter would go down a storm on social media - even if it wasn't what she wanted long term, if she could build audience etc it may get a foot in the door elsewhere in the training industry?
     
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  6. shevtheblue

    shevtheblue

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    My 3 year old is all but confirmed as being on the spectrum. Her speech is starting to come on but she's still behind peers and her behaviors have improved but she still does thing other kids don't. I have big fears for her future but reading this gives me some hope. I hope this works out well for your girl, i'm sure someone like Nuffield Health would love to promote something like this, PT seems to be all about confidence (as well as knowledge, obv) so probably best to start off small and work your way up.
     
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  7. somapop

    somapop

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    Absolutely - despite some social anxieties at times (quite intense) she used to make loads of youtube vids when she was younger and is well aware of social media marketing. One of her friends (probably, sadly, her only friend and someone she hasn't seen for quite some months) is autistic (they met at the hospital School) and has awful OCD. My daughter develops this adult persona when they go out (on rare occasions) almost mothering her so I think she has bags of empathy (and experience) which will help.

    Powerlifting is her thing and along with her nutrition its almost religious. Contrast to one year ago when she was eating nothing but junk food and no longer exercise (after her years swimming).
    It's definitely something I'l discuss with her but you have to be careful. She's accepted who she is but sometimes craves to be 'normal'. She was diagnosed as Asperger's btw but it's all under the autism spectrum umbrella now. She's high achieving and very bright (and razor sharp...hence the reference to Richard Pryor & cutting comedians)...thank god she rediscovered fitness as she was dipping quite badly last year.

    One of my queries was with nutritional advice. One of the courses is qualified with a nutritional body whereas the other isn't (and she prefers the cause that isn't) but I think either doesn't allow for the PT to give dietary facts, more a case of guidance.
    She has her own plan which she meticulously writes out every day (every calorie, weight...) and will be doing one for her older sister next week.
     
  8. somapop

    somapop

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    Good luck with it shev - I can try and answer a few questions if I can. My daughter wasn't diagnosed until she was around 10 - pretty much her final year at primary. We just put her down to being the 'black sheep' for years but the pointers were clearly there looking back. There's a lot more awareness and help around now and Manchester is very high up on helping children with mental health issues (though, of course, not perfect).

    It will change you all probably but you have to let it....I could no longer be the reserved, quiet adult when out with her. You have to go along with it and phase out the looks and noise. I've been for coffees with her dressed almost like Lee Scratch Perry (wearing my jacket, sunglasses, wellington boots). I used to be a fan of Syd Barrett growing up. I found the mad tales funny and 'cool', but I see so much of that in her it made me fee a bit guilty about semi worshipping mad musical heroes. In fact a doctor 'post diagnosed' Syd Barrett after he died (from notes and vernal behavioural studies) and stated he was very likely Asperger's. Add all those recreational drugs and lack of help...poor guy.

    There's some great help out there mate (CAHMS) and I'd encourage you to go along to as many course as you can. Much of that is having that solidarity with likewise parents, but to repeat my advice: go with her energy rather than grate against it: if she one day wants to wear a duffel coat and a bobble hat indoors during mid summer...let her. Their world is a little different is all.
    BTW - I'm no expert but there are a few on here that might be able to offer good advice.
     
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  9. flook

    flook

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    I have nothing to offer this thread other than best wishes to your daughter and yourself
     
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  10. quiet_riot

    quiet_riot

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    Do you know what as well, @somapop ? I'd be happy to be a guinea pig client! I have toyed myself with the idea of getting one of these 'remote' PTs after lockdown is over, as my pre-lockdown body is well gone, as I;ve been unable to get to the gym at all.
     

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