DNS Server issues

Discussion in 'Technical queries' started by Prestwich_Blue, 12 Apr 2018.

  1. Prestwich_Blue

    Prestwich_Blue

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    My Internet provider is BT & everything was working fine last night. Today, I appear to have Internet access on my home network but can't reach any websites. I've reset the router & it'll work OK for a minute then stop connecting even though everything seems OK. Also can't get any Internet provided TV channels.

    I've run network diagnostics which says that there's a DNS server error and I'm trying to reach a server that doesn't exist. Anyone offer an explanation/solution?
     
  2. Prestwich_Blue

    Prestwich_Blue

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    Thanks for all your helpful responses but it seems to have sorted itself out.
     
  3. Danamy

    Danamy

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    Sometimes it's best to say nothing at all ;-)
     
  4. blueinsa

    blueinsa

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    Used to to get this frequently with a BT/Chrome combination mate and despite several so called fixes on the net, always struggled to sort it out and rather than me magically fixing it i think it was a case of it solving itself most of the time.

    Annoying as fuck!

    Glad you seem to have it under control.
     
  5. auction294

    auction294

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    DNS is basically an address book of IP addresses, so if you want to visit bluemoon-mcfc.co.uk your DNS server will resolve this to 104.25.157.25 which is the sites IP. Much easier for us humans to type the Domain Name into our browser than the IP.

    By default a 'home' router will be your DNS server, something along the lines of 192.168.0.1. You can of course change the default DNS settings and many users, even some businesses will use Google's Public DNS servers; 8.8.8.8 as Primary, and 8.8.4.4 as a Secondary Server. These should always be available which is the reason they are used so much.

    Your PC wont resolve the IP address of a website unless you have visited the site before and your PC has a DNS entry, if it doesn't then it wil look to it's DNS server, if the DNS server that you have set doesn't know the address then it in turn sends out a recursive lookup to a DNS Server higher up the food chain of DNS servers until it finds the address to give to the PC.

    Glad you're sorted though, if you want to change your DNS:

    To change the DNS settings on your Windows 10 device using Control Panel, do the following:
    1. Open Control Panel.
    2. Click on Network and Internet.
    3. Click on Network and Sharing Center.
    4. On the left pane, click on Change adapter settings.
    5. Right-click the network interface connected to the internet, and select Properties.
    6. Select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) from the list.
    7. Click the Properties button.
    8. Click the Use the following DNS server addresses option
    9. Type your preferred and alternate DNS server addresses. Here you can enter any DNS servers you want, including from free ones such as Google Public DNS or OpenDNS.
    10. OpenDNS addresses: 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220 | Google's already listed above
    11. Click OK
    Windows 7 - same as above
     

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