Manchester City ship

Discussion in 'Bluemoon forum' started by WEMBLEY76, 14 May 2015.

  1. WEMBLEY76

    WEMBLEY76

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    Working in the shipping business,came across the following article,and a ship called Manchester City launched in 1899.Wonder what the tie in with our newly formed club was at that time,would appreciate any research input,I will investigate further myself.Not bad for a club with no history !
    Interesting how Manchester put itself on the world stage by overcoming the Liverpool port objections and building the canal to Salford docks,close to the Swamp.

    Below taken from Wikipedia

    Manchester Liners history

    The two secondhand vessels were joined in January 1899 by the newly built Manchester City of 7,696 grt, constructed by Raylton Dixon & Co of Middlesbrough. This steamship carried 1,170 long tons (1,190 t) of coal, burned at 70 long tons (71 t) per day, giving a speed of 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph), fast for her day.[8] She was a refrigerated vessel, designed to carry frozen meat and live cattle, and was claimed to be one of the largest meat-carrying ships then afloat.[9] She made a successful maiden voyage from Canada and up the new canal to Manchester, taking two days and stopping overnight at Irlam to give the crew a rest. The Manchester Guardian reported on 16 January 1899 that "there were many shakings of the head, not only in Liverpool, at the audacity of the attempt" and that "the canal pilots, on reaching Irlam, looked as if they had not been in bed for a week, as their eyes were bleared with exhaustion".[10] The City discharged 450 cattle and 150 sheep at Manchester Corporation's Foreign Animals Wharf near the Mode Wheel locks in Salford. With an overall length of 467 feet (142 m), she was by far the largest vessel to have ventured up the waterway, and her successful navigation disproved the claim of Liverpool owners that only ships of 350 feet (110 m) or less could safely reach Manchester. The vessel continued to Manchester docks for further unloading, where she was met by the Lord Mayor, accompanied by a band and a festive crowd.[8] This successful voyage did much to encourage other shipowners to use the new port.[11] On her first voyage to Halifax, Nova Scotia in March 1899, the City took nine days and sixteen hours; and arrived before the mail boat, which had left the Mersey twelve hours ahead of her.[12]
     
  2. TCIB

    TCIB

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    Neither here nor there!
    This is what i found on their naming policy...

    "The company's ship-naming policy throughout its 87-year period of operations was to use its home port's name plus a suffix word, often a trade or occupation. The most frequently used name was Manchester Trader, applied to six different vessels between 1898 and cessation of operations in 1985.[65] Some names used appropriately during the First World War, such as Manchester Hero, Manchester Brigade and Manchester Division were not reused after the disposal or loss of those vessels. Some ships operated short-term or on charter retained their original names and did not receive the Manchester prefix."
     
  3. WEMBLEY76

    WEMBLEY76

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    Cheers for that
     

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  4. mick10

    mick10

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    Somewhere it rains a lot.
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    Enjoyed that wee read you pair cheers.
     
  5. WEMBLEY76

    WEMBLEY76

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    Just been researching furthers and there were 4 ships during their near 100 year history named City.
    One was approx 1937 around the time we were champions and another during the 60s,wonder how the local Rag dockers felt unloading a ship called Manchester City within a mile of their midden.
     
  6. urmston

    urmston

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    I saw the Manchester City a few times in the 60s as we lived near Irlam docks and we used to go on walks from Urmston, over the now defunct ferry at Irlam and on to Irlam park.
     
  7. Gary James

    Gary James

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    'Manchester City Folklore' see @garyjameswriter
    As far as my research has shown the pre-1937 ships were named Manchester City after the city of Manchester, not the football club. But the 1937 Manchester City ship was deliberately named to celebrate City's 1937 Championship success. I included details of this and photos from the ship in my first book (From Maine Men to Banana Citizens in 1989) and in the 1st edition of Manchester the Greatest City (1997 - I had to drop the page for something else in the 2002 edition).

    As well as the 1937 ship City have had trains officially named after them.

    In the 1890s/early 1900s there was also a horse named "Manchester City" and I do think this was named after the football club but my research on that has not proved a definite link (yet - but I'm still looking!).
     

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