panic attacks

Phil.mcfc

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 Nov 2008
Messages
256
Location
Manchester
today my mum had a panic attack at work, she's never had one before and since then she has had two more tonight, she said she goes really dizzy and her legs go numb also her breathing goes worse, I keep reassuring her she will be okay, I know panic attacks can't hurt you but I'm wondering if any blue's have any tips I could tell her what might slow them down, thanks
 

kronkonite

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 Apr 2007
Messages
2,313
hearsay only not a medic
Breathing into a brown paper bag can stop the hyper ventilating


try to "get" the triggers

had a few pals victims of this who say try not to over complicate the problem
 

Royle appointment

Active Member
Joined
4 Jun 2009
Messages
31
Phil
I used to suffer from them really badly, its very difficult when you are suffering from them to offer advice as you are literally in a state of panic.
A couple of things used to help me.
No one has ever died through a panic attack and lie on a bed and just try to relax, breath nice and deep and try to picture yourself in a relaxed place.
I had some hypnotherapy after the doctor prescribed me some betablockers, and i have been fine for the last few years (tablet free)
Your mum has just got to learn to relax which is easier said than done, i feel for her coz it was bloody awful, she will be fine though.
 

mammutly

Well-Known Member
Joined
8 Apr 2008
Messages
13,384
Location
At foot of our stairs
Phil.mcfc said:
today my mum had a panic attack at work, she's never had one before and since then she has had two more tonight, she said she goes really dizzy and her legs go numb also her breathing goes worse, I keep reassuring her she will be okay, I know panic attacks can't hurt you but I'm wondering if any blue's have any tips I could tell her what might slow them down, thanks

It's important that your mum goes to her GP to rule out other possible causes for this.
 

johnny on the spot

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 Jul 2006
Messages
24,748
Phil,

I have bipolar disorder and anxiety attacks come with the territory. At my worst in my early twenties, I would have up to six or seven in a day. They are very distressing, debilitating and disturbing to others when they occur.

First and foremost: You can not die from an anxiety attack, no matter how distressing it is.

Over time, regular sufferers can become able to recognise the triggers and learn to either face or avoid them CBT is useful for this. Quite often though, attacks appear very unpredictably and the sufferer develops a mindset of anxiety about having an anxiety attack. Metaphorically walking blindfolded through a minefield, this in itself becomes a trigger.

At the extreme height of my symptoms I was diagnosed with Diazepam, which basically acts like a bat around the head and relieves symptoms very quickly. This isn't useful as a long term measure as it's very addictive. I've also tried beta-blockers (Propanalol) which slow the heart rate and are often used by performers for stage fright.

As mammutly says, get your mum to her GP who as well as prescribing medicines can access other treatments like counselling and CBT (both of which work well).

In the meantime, there are loads of great books out there and some top websites.

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_and_conditions/panic_attacks" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_a ... ic_attacks</a>

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/phobias/Pages/Panicattacks.aspx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/phobias/Page ... tacks.aspx</a>
 

KpxSte

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 Dec 2008
Messages
338
Location
Ashton
Tell your Mum to look through this: <a class="postlink" href="http://www.anxiety-panic-attacks-phobias.co.uk/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.anxiety-panic-attacks-phobias.co.uk/</a>.
Reading about other people's similar feelings and experiences whilst realising that she's not alone will help. Understanding the problem is the only way of solving it. Good luck!
 

Gaylord du Bois

Well-Known Member
Joined
16 Aug 2010
Messages
26,237
Location
Great Umbrage.
johnny on the spot said:
Phil,

I have bipolar disorder and anxiety attacks come with the territory. At my worst in my early twenties, I would have up to six or seven in a day. They are very distressing, debilitating and disturbing to others when they occur.

First and foremost: You can not die from an anxiety attack, no matter how distressing it is.

Over time, regular sufferers can become able to recognise the triggers and learn to either face or avoid them CBT is useful for this. Quite often though, attacks appear very unpredictably and the sufferer develops a mindset of anxiety about having an anxiety attack. Metaphorically walking blindfolded through a minefield, this in itself becomes a trigger.

At the extreme height of my symptoms I was diagnosed with Diazepam, which basically acts like a bat around the head and relieves symptoms very quickly. This isn't useful as a long term measure as it's very addictive. I've also tried beta-blockers (Propanalol) which slow the heart rate and are often used by performers for stage fright.

As mammutly says, get your mum to her GP who as well as prescribing medicines can access other treatments like counselling and CBT (both of which work well).

In the meantime, there are loads of great books out there and some top websites.

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_and_conditions/panic_attacks" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_a ... ic_attacks</a>

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/phobias/Pages/Panicattacks.aspx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/phobias/Page ... tacks.aspx</a>

Good advice. I admire your honesty. I've had an insight into both through my younger sister. Just to reassure the op one doesn't necessarily follow the other. Seek advice. Best wishes to you all.
 

Glazers_Wallet

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 Jan 2010
Messages
1,281
Location
The CrAzY bus doing the poznan
Phil.mcfc said:
today my mum had a panic attack at work, she's never had one before and since then she has had two more tonight, she said she goes really dizzy and her legs go numb also her breathing goes worse, I keep reassuring her she will be okay, I know panic attacks can't hurt you but I'm wondering if any blue's have any tips I could tell her what might slow them down, thanks


i suffered for about 4 years with panic attacks & anxiety attacks (more or less the same thing) i still do every now n then.

the reason you have a "panic" attack is just a rush of adrenaline and it is your body telling you to go and "hunt" as humans we are hunters ect..... (so my counciler said)

The reason you go dizzy is because your OVER breathing, the best thing to do is sit down and breathe through your nose. the main feeling when you have a panic attack is thinking your going to die and you cant breathe and your going to pass out. first of all it is not possible for your body to pass out when having a panic attack, and you cant die from a panic attack. but if she wants any better help refer her to this site <a class="postlink" href="http://www.nomorepanic.co.uk" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.nomorepanic.co.uk</a>


i'm kinda half asleep here so if that doesnt make sense im sorry lol<br /><br />-- Mon Nov 29, 2010 11:32 pm --<br /><br />
johnny on the spot said:
Phil,

I have bipolar disorder and anxiety attacks come with the territory. At my worst in my early twenties, I would have up to six or seven in a day. They are very distressing, debilitating and disturbing to others when they occur.

First and foremost: You can not die from an anxiety attack, no matter how distressing it is.

Over time, regular sufferers can become able to recognise the triggers and learn to either face or avoid them CBT is useful for this. Quite often though, attacks appear very unpredictably and the sufferer develops a mindset of anxiety about having an anxiety attack. Metaphorically walking blindfolded through a minefield, this in itself becomes a trigger.

At the extreme height of my symptoms I was diagnosed with Diazepam, which basically acts like a bat around the head and relieves symptoms very quickly. This isn't useful as a long term measure as it's very addictive. I've also tried beta-blockers (Propanalol) which slow the heart rate and are often used by performers for stage fright.

As mammutly says, get your mum to her GP who as well as prescribing medicines can access other treatments like counselling and CBT (both of which work well).

In the meantime, there are loads of great books out there and some top websites.

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_and_conditions/panic_attacks" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_a ... ic_attacks</a>

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/phobias/Pages/Panicattacks.aspx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/phobias/Page ... tacks.aspx</a>

i was put on propanalol last year i made the mistake of reading the box, i only ever ended up taking one, i found counceling alot better :) i too am in my early 20's
 

johnny on the spot

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 Jul 2006
Messages
24,748
Yeah, propanalol comes with a pretty scary list of possible side effects, mostly to do with the heart. I was prescribed quite a high dose as well and left them alone after about a month.

One of the scariest things about panic attacks is that panic is contagious and tends to scare the shit out of people if they've never seen a full-blown anxiety attack. When you feel like you're dying and someone next to you has that 'Holy shit!' look on their face, it just makes it worse.
 

Don't have an account?

Register now!
Top
  AdBlock Detected
Bluemoon relies on advertising to pay our hosting fees. Please support the site by disabling your ad blocking software to help keep the forum sustainable. Thanks.