Sinead O'Connor

somapop

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Heartbreaking this and echo what's been said above.
I cannot think of anything worse. I have a daughter who is troubled and struggles a lot with her mental health (ironically she's just started shaving her head lately) and I'm constantly checking in.

Heart goes out to Sinead. Felt of late she may have wrestled some of her demons.
 

hammocity

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Heartbreaking this and echo what's been said above.
I cannot think of anything worse. I have a daughter who is troubled and struggles a lot with her mental health (ironically she's just started shaving her head lately) and I'm constantly checking in.

Heart goes out to Sinead. Felt of late she may have wrestled some of her demons.
Friend of mine has a stepdaughter who lives in Buxton on her own but lives for her cat. She’s had serious mental issues and the Doctors have tried everything to help her cope with life but there is no cure. They have said to my mate and her mother her mind is irreparably broken, it’s like a leg that’s so badly fractured it just can’t be knitted together. She’s early 30’s now and her weight has ballooned from 10st to 17st. They fear when the cat dies so will she. I used to see her as a young teenager when at my mates house, she was a bubbly, intelligent girl with an absolute thirst for knowledge. Mental illness had to be one of the cruellest illnesses a parent has to endure, so sad this story.
 

somapop

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Friend of mine has a stepdaughter who lives in Buxton on her own but lives for her cat. She’s had serious mental issues and the Doctors have tried everything to help her cope with life but there is no cure. They have said to my mate and her mother her mind is irreparably broken, it’s like a leg that’s so badly fractured it just can’t be knitted together. She’s early 30’s now and her weight has ballooned from 10st to 17st. They fear when the cat dies so will she. I used to see her as a young teenager when at my mates house, she was a bubbly, intelligent girl with an absolute thirst for knowledge. Mental illness had to be one of the cruellest illnesses a parent has to endure, so sad this story.
My goodness.
Terribly sad. Presume she's on some form of medication that at least alleviates some of the issues?
My daughter lives with her mum, sister and brother but I see her most days as she's only a few miles downs the road.
She's high functioning autism (ASD, previously placed in the Asperger's box) but has often mentioned suicide over the years. She has no friends (she's 17) and missed the entirety of her high school education, but she's super bright.
Recently started college but rare she can make it in.

You try your best but sometimes can't reach out enough to really help them. Fortunately she's still really sporty (she was a really good swimmer but now powerlifts and is obsessive over 'macros' etc)
It is a devastating illness (and really a whole catalogue of illnesses that affect the mind).

I do get sad over what will happen to her in the future....can she settle down and have relationships eventually.
 

hammocity

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My goodness.
Terribly sad. Presume she's on some form of medication that at least alleviates some of the issues?
My daughter lives with her mum, sister and brother but I see her most days as she's only a few miles downs the road.
She's high functioning autism (ASD, previously placed in the Asperger's box) but has often mentioned suicide over the years. She has no friends (she's 17) and missed the entirety of her high school education, but she's super bright.
Recently started college but rare she can make it in.

You try your best but sometimes can't reach out enough to really help them. Fortunately she's still really sporty (she was a really good swimmer but now powerlifts and is obsessive over 'macros' etc)
It is a devastating illness (and really a whole catalogue of illnesses that affect the mind).

I do get sad over what will happen to her in the future....can she settle down and have relationships eventually.
Having seen what my mate and his wife are going through I can slightly empathise with your situation, it must almost dominate your life.

You just have to hope your daughter gets the help to cope with her mental illness. The sad thing is some people have no sympathy for those suffering with a range of disorders.

My mum always told me from a young age to respect mental illness as she suffered from bouts of depression, she always said broken bones gets sympathy, broken minds get called disparaging names.

I wish you all the best with your daughter.
 

fulabeer

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14 Jan 2010
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The question is why mental health issues are on the rise.

Social media/internet is probably responsible for a lot of young people having issues.

Sometimes i see a direct link to the parents(and their lifestyle/environment) being a major factor.

I suppose she will blame everybody else except herself...
 

nellyonthewing

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My wife & I adopted our daughter when she was 10. By 13 she was already self harming and running away, getting in trouble . At 17 she was in prison and pregnant. Countless failed attempts to kill herself and physical attacks on us later we are now estranged. She is 39 years old now and we have tried to support her through all her many trials and tribulations but her unstable lifestyle is too much for us to handle in our 70's so we focus on supporting her daughter( our granddaughter) and our two perfectly normal sons.. It seems her natural parents both had mental health issues and she was born with foetal alcohol syndrome.
Our hearts go out to any other parents dealing with this.
 

Dadsupportedthem

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I just read that her son was assessed when he was 8 and the math and English capabilities of a sixteen year old. Very sad.
 

Fode N The Hole

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My goodness.
Terribly sad. Presume she's on some form of medication that at least alleviates some of the issues?
My daughter lives with her mum, sister and brother but I see her most days as she's only a few miles downs the road.
She's high functioning autism (ASD, previously placed in the Asperger's box) but has often mentioned suicide over the years. She has no friends (she's 17) and missed the entirety of her high school education, but she's super bright.
Recently started college but rare she can make it in.

You try your best but sometimes can't reach out enough to really help them. Fortunately she's still really sporty (she was a really good swimmer but now powerlifts and is obsessive over 'macros' etc)
It is a devastating illness (and really a whole catalogue of illnesses that affect the mind).

I do get sad over what will happen to her in the future....can she settle down and have relationships eventually.

She probably can mate. But it's all about finding her niche. I'm sure you have moments when it is tough but it could be a lot worse. She isn't non verbal and she is bright and has interests she is excelling at.

You say she doesn't have friends but does she strike up conversations and make bonds with people with similar interests? Or do you think she would be capable of doing that.

It might just be case of "finding her tribe" and she can grow in confidence.
 

Bill Walker

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Heartbreaking this and echo what's been said above.
I cannot think of anything worse. I have a daughter who is troubled and struggles a lot with her mental health (ironically she's just started shaving her head lately) and I'm constantly checking in.

Heart goes out to Sinead. Felt of late she may have wrestled some of her demons.
Yes, I'm gutted for Sinead. Is there anything in life worse than losing a child in these circumstances, (not an accident or natural causes).
I hope you daughter is ok mate. Hopefully it's just a growing up phase..

My mate had big trouble's with his son, who was suffering very badly with anxiety and depression. So bad he couldnt go out some days, just lay there shaking, all day.
I spent hours talking to my mate about it, trying to help, there seemed to be no answers out there. His doctor blamed it on him smoking grass. He said it can exacerbate any underlying natural anxiety a person may have and make it a lot worse. Leading to depression.
I tried some of the weed he'd been smoking, not had any for 40 years...wow! it was so much stronger than the stuff we smoked at college.
 

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