The FTSE

MCFC_ Phil

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Joined
27 Apr 2012
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706
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Failsworth
A lot of this recent sell off is due to the fear that the Fed will raise rates at a pace that the markets don’t like and will wind up their QE programme too quickly. The notes they released earlier this month have spooked markets, in particular growth orientated funds, as the perception is that the cheap money that they have had access to for 13 years is coming to an end.

This has hit Tech hard and other sectors have been hit due to the perceived squeeze that higher rates and inflation will have on spending power. The Fed and other global central banks have a difficult job. Controlling rampant inflation whilst at the same time ensuring that their decisions don’t harm economic recovery is a fine balancing act. I’m sure even the policy makers will be alarmed at how their comments have impacted the markets! It wouldn’t surprise me to see these comments toned down in subsequent meeting minutes.

History has shown that most falls that are severe and reactionary tend to be overdone and the subsequent bounce can be strong. Is Microsoft really worth 12% less than it was 2 weeks ago?

The FTSE100 has held up well due to its constituents being more “old economy” like Oil and Gas, Mining, Banks and Insurers. all benefitting from energy price rises/higher rate perception. It is giving a false impression to many at the moment as that’s the one that tends to be on News at Ten! Value funds are winning the race at the moment but of course they have lagged for years.

My view is if you don’t need the cash, you revert back to your original objective and risk appetite and you step back from looking at it for a few weeks. Sometimes heart rules head when you see your hard earned falling but those who react to short term noise are often the ones who lose out. My pension was down by 35% in the weeks after Covid. It had recovered all of this 6m later. It wasn’t comfortable viewing but I didn’t need or was even able to access it so kept the faith.
Agree re the pension, at the start of covid I really shat myself watching my fund go down (started saving at 20), thinking no retirement for me. Held out though and now its stronger than ever.
 

Hutchymcfc

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
582
Location
Cleckheaton
Mine Is down but I wait till when I get the yearly reports I’m in it long term

i just come into some money , would you invest now or wait was thinking investing half now and half mid April
 

Kompany Car

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 Sep 2015
Messages
1,854
A lot of this recent sell off is due to the fear that the Fed will raise rates at a pace that the markets don’t like and will wind up their QE programme too quickly. The notes they released earlier this month have spooked markets, in particular growth orientated funds, as the perception is that the cheap money that they have had access to for 13 years is coming to an end.

This has hit Tech hard and other sectors have been hit due to the perceived squeeze that higher rates and inflation will have on spending power. The Fed and other global central banks have a difficult job. Controlling rampant inflation whilst at the same time ensuring that their decisions don’t harm economic recovery is a fine balancing act. I’m sure even the policy makers will be alarmed at how their comments have impacted the markets! It wouldn’t surprise me to see these comments toned down in subsequent meeting minutes.

History has shown that most falls that are severe and reactionary tend to be overdone and the subsequent bounce can be strong. Is Microsoft really worth 12% less than it was 2 weeks ago?

The FTSE100 has held up well due to its constituents being more “old economy” like Oil and Gas, Mining, Banks and Insurers. all benefitting from energy price rises/higher rate perception. It is giving a false impression to many at the moment as that’s the one that tends to be on News at Ten! Value funds are winning the race at the moment but of course they have lagged for years.

My view is if you don’t need the cash, you revert back to your original objective and risk appetite and you step back from looking at it for a few weeks. Sometimes heart rules head when you see your hard earned falling but those who react to short term noise are often the ones who lose out. My pension was down by 35% in the weeks after Covid. It had recovered all of this 6m later. It wasn’t comfortable viewing but I didn’t need or was even able to access it so kept the faith.
Next week could be interesting as the Q1 earnings announcements of the tech firms should be out which have had a bit of a hammering recently. So expect these to pick up next week and the NASDAQ to recover.
 

manchester blue

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 May 2008
Messages
9,295
Location
Manchester
Team supported
Manchester City
A lot of this recent sell off is due to the fear that the Fed will raise rates at a pace that the markets don’t like and will wind up their QE programme too quickly. The notes they released earlier this month have spooked markets, in particular growth orientated funds, as the perception is that the cheap money that they have had access to for 13 years is coming to an end.

This has hit Tech hard and other sectors have been hit due to the perceived squeeze that higher rates and inflation will have on spending power. The Fed and other global central banks have a difficult job. Controlling rampant inflation whilst at the same time ensuring that their decisions don’t harm economic recovery is a fine balancing act. I’m sure even the policy makers will be alarmed at how their comments have impacted the markets! It wouldn’t surprise me to see these comments toned down in subsequent meeting minutes.

History has shown that most falls that are severe and reactionary tend to be overdone and the subsequent bounce can be strong. Is Microsoft really worth 12% less than it was 2 weeks ago?

The FTSE100 has held up well due to its constituents being more “old economy” like Oil and Gas, Mining, Banks and Insurers. all benefitting from energy price rises/higher rate perception. It is giving a false impression to many at the moment as that’s the one that tends to be on News at Ten! Value funds are winning the race at the moment but of course they have lagged for years.

My view is if you don’t need the cash, you revert back to your original objective and risk appetite and you step back from looking at it for a few weeks. Sometimes heart rules head when you see your hard earned falling but those who react to short term noise are often the ones who lose out. My pension was down by 35% in the weeks after Covid. It had recovered all of this 6m later. It wasn’t comfortable viewing but I didn’t need or was even able to access it so kept the faith.
Good advice mate. Not looked at mine but I know it’s took a big hit to start the year. I got my investments after the initial Covid dip so I’m still well in profit but it’s hard to see big losses so I’m not going to!
 
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Manchester33

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 Sep 2012
Messages
5,195
When the markets are down you can tell who knows what they’re doing and who doesn’t.
Right now is a brilliant time to invest. It’s an opportunity to buy stocks at a good price. If your financial goal is so close that these fluctuations really affect your mental health, you need to reconsider what you’re investing in.
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 Jul 2006
Messages
4,437
Cashed out 9 weeks ago and the money in the bank is doing a lot better than $hitcoin.
Fair play mate as at the moment everything is on its arse but long term there will only be one winner and it won’t be having money in the scummy banks.
 

Jordie

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Joined
26 Jul 2009
Messages
2,454
Location
In the corner of the morning in the past
Add me to the list of people who are getting twatted all over the park at the moment! Highlights include the Baillie Gifford American fund which has served me so well in the past 18 months tanking day after day. All my other Baillie Giffords performing badly too. Plus NIO doesn't look like it's going to the moon anytime soon. I was hoping that would be my golden ticket to an early retirement. At this rate, I'll be retiring when I'm about 86 - assuming I'm still around then!
Did you see the feature about NIO on 'Fifth Gear Recharged'? It's a car show on Quest. They were very complimentary about Nio's new car that is coming out shortly, even calling it a gamechanger because instead of recharging the batteries which can take a very long time you just change the batteries in 5 mins.
 

M18CTID

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Joined
15 Jul 2008
Messages
16,284
Location
In the cricket club at Burnley away
Did you see the feature about NIO on 'Fifth Gear Recharged'? It's a car show on Quest. They were very complimentary about Nio's new car that is coming out shortly, even calling it a gamechanger because instead of recharging the batteries which can take a very long time you just change the batteries in 5 mins.
I didn't see it but that sounds like the battery swap service that NIO already offers so might not be anything new? They've hundreds of battery swap stations in China and will no doubt open them elsewhere as the company goes global. It gets round the issue of spending hours charging your car - just pop into a battery swap station and get a fresh battery back installed in no time:

 

journolud

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Joined
26 Apr 2006
Messages
7,557
Location
Macclesfield
More pain for the portfolio this morning. Suspect the Ukraine situation playing a part but no point thinking too deeply about it, can only sit and watch. Got a feeling similar to City’s old relegation seasons but at least I know how that story ends
 

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