Two close pals died within a week of each other. They weren't even old.

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Magicpole, 13 Mar 2018.

  1. Magicpole

    Magicpole

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    Its hard to take when your pals fall. It seems strange that I will never see them again. I had a funeral last Tuesday and the other is on Friday. It certainly brings mortality home to you. I have been to the funerals of my pals and my own parents but this feels different. I've been on a downer as you can imagine, just feels unreal and Friday will be tough. If this was ten years from now It might be easier to take, no age at all.
     
  2. Wreckless Alec

    Wreckless Alec

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    You don't say how old they were but the mortality, of both yourself and others, is something that most people tend to park until it is shockingly brought home by the death of someone close to you.

    I think, given that it happens to all of us, it's something that is better embraced than ignored. When my son was serving in Afghanistan I prepared myself for the unnatural possibility of outliving my child and came to terms with it in my own way. I think It's something everyone should contemplate as part of their personal philosophy and decide what brings you comfort.
     
  3. Magicpole

    Magicpole

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    Wise words. I have come to terms with my own mortality a while ago. Its a natural part of life, I suppose the two of them early 50's gave me a jolt. I have three sons and if they were serving I know that would have been even tougher thinking about it, never mind it happening. That I doubt I could ever get over.
     
  4. Wreckless Alec

    Wreckless Alec

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    Of course you wouldn't. But you'd come to terms with it on the basis that if the shoe was on the other foot you wouldn't want your parent to waste a second of their life grieving.

    Also, never having had any religion myself, I've become less dismissive of an afterlife since studying the subject. What I found particularly interesting was that, having looked after my dad with Alzheimer's for 3 or 4 years, shortly before he died, he began to see his dead parents regularly. And he was overjoyed to see them again. It was a genuine comfort to him in his madness and confusion. But I ask myself, were they really there ?
     
  5. Magicpole

    Magicpole

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    No, but they were to him and if it gave him comfort then thats great. I understand the hoping to see loved ones again, is natural, but I don't think it happens. I prefer to see them as still alive in me, my siblings and my children, in my memory. Anything else is to me is wishful thinking.
     
  6. TonyM

    TonyM

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    Throw a bit of sawdust down for safety.
     

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