Cool stuff on the radio

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by PinkFinal, 7 Nov 2017.

  1. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  2. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  3. Djibrilshairdo

    Djibrilshairdo

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    Paddy McAloon interview on RadMac 6 Music this a.m. interesting.

    In contrast, the Tracy Thorn interview earlier in the week was ruined by harpie Lavern.
     
  4. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  5. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  6. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  7. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003l4w

    A special ‘Friday Night Is Music Night’ with the full sound of the 60 piece BBC Concert Orchestra plus rock band, this edition celebrates the life and work of David Bowie. Starring Tony Vincent (who made his name in ‘Rent’, then ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ and ‘We Will Rock You’) and conducted by Brent Havens, the concert is presented by the legendary Bob Harris, who was friends with Bowie when David was just starting out … Among Bob’s recollections, introducing the original backing track to ‘Space Oddity’ on a cassette player with David at a night club - to derision and apathy! The concert features new symphonic arrangements of Bowie classics including Ziggy Stardust, Life On Mars, Changes, Rebel Rebel, Under Pressure and celebrating it’s fiftieth anniversary, Space Oddity
     
  8. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    The French Resistance
    The Reunion


    Sue MacGregor brings together members of the French Resistance who fought against Nazi German occupation of France and the collaborationist Vichy regime during the Second World War.

    On 18 June 1940, as the French Prime Minister Phillipe Pétain prepared to sign an armistice with the Nazi invaders, General Charles de Gaulle spoke to the French people on the BBC from London asking them to join him in continuing the war.

    “You had to be completely insane to believe him at the time,” says John James - then one of 8 million refugees fleeing the advancing German army. “For people like me, to know everything wasn’t lost, gave us great hope.”

    Hundreds of thousands of people answered de Gaulle’s call and joined the French Resistance.

    They carried out acts of sabotage against the Nazis and their Vichy allies, published underground pamphlets or offered help to downed allied airmen or the persecuted Jewish population. Over 100,000 members of resistance movements died during the war – some executed, others killed in combat or left to die in camps.

    De Gaulle’s relationship with the Allies was difficult. London and Washington considered that the liberation was the task of the Allied troops, who would then occupy France under the authority of an allied Military Government that would run the country. De Gaulle and important sections of the Resistance had other ideas.

    Sue MacGregor is joined by Marcel Jaurent Singer, a secret agent of the Special Operations Executive set up by Winston Churchill; Rene Marbot, a soldier in de Gaulle’s Free French army; John James, a member of a guerrilla fighting unit; Michèle Agniel who helped Allied airmen escape to freedom; and historian Matthew Cobb.
     

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