Prog rock

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by tamworthblue, 26 Jan 2018.

  1. fredmont

    fredmont

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    Last edited: 9 Feb 2020
  2. chesterbells

    chesterbells

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    Great title that
     
  3. blueparrot

    blueparrot

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    I suppose albums like 2112, Hemispheres, were their most prog albums with hard rock leanings, where as from permanent waves they began to move away towards rock band with some prog leanings. Though Clockwork Angels with its concept would be more prog than mainstream.
    I guess they straddled the two camps which explains their success.
     
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  4. TueartsOHK

    TueartsOHK

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    That’s a good summary of Rush. I first really noticed their keyboards on Permanent Waves but even up to Moving Pictures guitar was the dominant instrument. I love the period 2112 to Moving Pictures but from Signals onwards I stopped buying their albums as they became less and less of a rock band for me. Clockwork Angels was a decent album though.

    Same with Genesis I love the Gabriel stuff and the 2 albums as a 4 piece are great. But Duke was the last album I really loved - I still bought the later albums but for me they were a different band. Still making some good songs but a lot of album fillers and novelty tracks too.

    Where as Yes (aside from the 2 more commercial albums with Trevor Rabin) have consistently made Prog. Not always of the highest quality I might add. Looking at the list I posted I think Yes pretty much tick all those boxes more than any other band.
     
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  5. OB1

    OB1

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    Starcastle shone briefly but brightly. Wonderful band.
     
  6. chesterbells

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    Interesting with Rush. Over the years I’ve never thought of them as prog, probably because they were more hard rock and less keyboard-centric than what I consider prog - but I can see an argument on paper for classifying them as prog I suppose.
    I certainly wouldn’t think of them in the same bracket as Yes, Genesis, Marillion etc.
     
  7. Hart of the Matter

    Hart of the Matter

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    Prog friendly bands from the 80s are few and far between. At a push you could make a case for Marillion and King Crimson. Palas and some other neo prog.

    I also think you could include some prog leaning bands like Talk Talk and The The. I even think Frankie Goes to Holywood and Simple Minds Street Fighting Years. Ozric Tentacles were space rock/Hillage influenced. I think a lot of ambient house was also infuenced by Prog. A strange transitionay period for sure.
     
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  8. chesterbells

    chesterbells

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    Yeah, I’d have to add Asia to that first category.
    Re your point about Talk Talk etc, I’ll bet those bands would have taken it as an insult back in the day if an interviewer had called them prog rock!
     
    Last edited: 9 Feb 2020
  9. chabal

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  10. journolud

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    I'm enjoying the book, first couple of chapters give an interesting history and context of the growth of "prog rock" out of psychedlia and an examination of what it actually is, inclduing the "crossover" with classical. He then gets into diferent bands, starting off with KIng Crimson and I don't think many wlould dispute that their debut was the first prog rock album. There's some interesting snippets from interviews with various band members and its offered a great insight for me (some of you may be more familiar with the story). It's led me to listen or re listen to some of the King Crimson stuff I hadn't heard before.

    I've also read chapter on the first part of PInk Floyd's careeer (up to and including Dark Side of the Moon). Although I'm much more familiar with their story there are still new insights from interviews with those who were there at the time.

    I thought I might lose interest when getting into discssions about bands I don't really follow, this might still happen but curently reading about ELP and rather than lose interest it has made me want to give them a listen.

    I suspect that the authors very technical descriptions of some of the music might get repetetive but up to now I'd have to say I'm very glad I bought this book, well worth a read.
     

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