Cool stuff on the radio

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by PinkFinal, 7 Nov 2017.

  1. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    This should have been on 5 Live tonight

    The Stateless World Cup
    Sunday 1 July

    9.00pm-9.30pm

    BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

    No South Asian team has qualified for this year's World Cup in Russia. But for some British Asians, that doesn't matter. They're gearing up for another tournament - ConIFA, the world cup for stateless people, taking place in London.
    Panjab FA is one of the teams taking part. They’ll be playing against the likes of Northern Cyprus, Tibet and Western Armenia. Panjab FA represents an area that stretches across parts of Eastern Pakistan and Northern India, but why is representing a country that doesn’t exist so important to these players?

    BBC Asian Network's Nalini Sivathasan finds out why the Stateless World Cup is about more than just football and explores why some Punjabis and Tamils feel their identities are under threat. She follows the supporters and players - most of who were born and brought up in the UK - as they put the final touches to their pre-tournament preparation. Nalini asks why British Asians with full time jobs are sacrificing their time to play for these unknown states.
     
  2. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  3. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    Inspired by the chaotic life of David Bowie during the making of the Low album released in 1977. This quirky, darkly comic drama by Sean Grundy takes a look into the mind of David Bowie during his years in Berlin.

    After leaving LA, which he later said had brought him to the edge of sanity, Berlin influenced his recovery and inspired him to create one of 20th century's most iconic albums.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b90l1c
     
  4. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  5. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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  6. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    Last edited: 3 Aug 2018
  7. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    PinkFinal

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  9. PinkFinal

    PinkFinal

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    Tuesday: The Last Enemy

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bgrhy1

    Of all the horrors of the Great War of 1914-1918, perhaps the worst was saved for the end. Writer Nicholas Rankin tracks how the outbreak of influenza in the late summer of 1918 turned into the worst pandemic since the Black Death of the 1340s. Ten million died in WW1, but the 'flu virus' of a century ago killed between 50 and 100 million people in every corner of the globe. In that last year of the war scientists understood bacteria and the germ theory of disease, but they did not have the technology to see viruses, let alone understand them. The unique conditions of the First World War gave the flu virus unparalleled opportunities to reproduce and kill. Millions of healthy young men, packed together into troopships, crowded in camps and trenches, living in battlefields contaminated by poison gases, were like a giant petri dish. Soldiers died like flies, but civilians who flocked together to celebrate the Armistice on 11th November 1918 also infected each other. Modern transport - steamships, railways, bicycles in Africa - helped deadly influenza spread world-wide as troops returned home at the war's end. Once dubbed 'the forgotten pandemic' it is now being re-researched by scientists and historians who wish to learn its lessons for today. In the 1970s, the writer Richard Collier advertised in the newspapers of 29 countries asking for survivors' stories, and in the Imperial War Museum Nicholas Rankin leafs through his huge archive of vivid replies. He also travels to Glasnevin Cemetery in Dublin to hear what oral history can tell us about the impact of the pandemic in Ireland. And he learns how influenza devastated native peoples worldwide, particularly in Polynesia, where a quarter of the population of Western Samoa died.
     
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