If the world was created by a Big Bang?

Manchester33

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Just reading the life on venus thread

space frazzles my Brain and so much my pea brain cant grasp.

like that there are more planets in the universe than grains of sand On earth

and that space is always expanding! Well whats it expanding into?

And that some stars we see arent actually there anymore
I really find the 'habitable planets' discussion very interesting - along with the Fermi Paradox.

Let's say we are incredibly, ridiculously rare and that the chance of Earth becoming what it is was around 0.00001%.

In the Milky Way (so just our galaxy, remember there are trillions of galaxies in the universe, but we will just focus on ours) there are Sextillion (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) 'earth-like' planets. If we apply our 0.00001%, there are still trillions and trillions of planets that should harbour life as advanced as Earth. Also, chances are the chance of life developing in some form is higher than that percentage (as we can see a bit of evidence for life in Venus and potentially Mars).

Now, remember that is literally 'planets'. We already know there is evidence of microbial life on comets. We know that various moons (Titan for example) could potentially harbour life.

Mathematically it's inevitable complex life exists/existed.


So there must be a 'great filter' that either prevents life getting to where we are (which means we've passed the great filter - very good, but lonely news) OR there is an earth ending filter ahead of us, that stops us from being complex enough to venture to other inhabited places.
 

marcus

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I really find the 'habitable planets' discussion very interesting - along with the Fermi Paradox.

Let's say we are incredibly, ridiculously rare and that the chance of Earth becoming what it is was around 0.00001%.

In the Milky Way (so just our galaxy, remember there are trillions of galaxies in the universe, but we will just focus on ours) there are Sextillion (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) 'earth-like' planets. If we apply our 0.00001%, there are still trillions and trillions of planets that should harbour life as advanced as Earth. Also, chances are the chance of life developing in some form is higher than that percentage (as we can see a bit of evidence for life in Venus and potentially Mars).

Now, remember that is literally 'planets'. We already know there is evidence of microbial life on comets. We know that various moons (Titan for example) could potentially harbour life.

Mathematically it's inevitable complex life exists/existed.


So there must be a 'great filter' that either prevents life getting to where we are (which means we've passed the great filter - very good, but lonely news) OR there is an earth ending filter ahead of us, that stops us from being complex enough to venture to other inhabited places.
Just run that last paragraph past me again ...
 

denislawsbackheel

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28 May 2008
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I really find the 'habitable planets' discussion very interesting - along with the Fermi Paradox.

Let's say we are incredibly, ridiculously rare and that the chance of Earth becoming what it is was around 0.00001%.

In the Milky Way (so just our galaxy, remember there are trillions of galaxies in the universe, but we will just focus on ours) there are Sextillion (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) 'earth-like' planets. If we apply our 0.00001%, there are still trillions and trillions of planets that should harbour life as advanced as Earth. Also, chances are the chance of life developing in some form is higher than that percentage (as we can see a bit of evidence for life in Venus and potentially Mars).

Now, remember that is literally 'planets'. We already know there is evidence of microbial life on comets. We know that various moons (Titan for example) could potentially harbour life.

Mathematically it's inevitable complex life exists/existed.


So there must be a 'great filter' that either prevents life getting to where we are (which means we've passed the great filter - very good, but lonely news) OR there is an earth ending filter ahead of us, that stops us from being complex enough to venture to other inhabited places.
There may be far more variables that act against life evolving.
For instance we now know that without earth’s magnetic field diverting solar particles our atmosphere would have gone the way of Mars.
Or the universe is actually the 95% of stuff we cannot detect, teeming with life, and the matter universe we are part of is an aberration.
Or there is loads of intelligent life out there. It only needs to be a couple of centuries ahead of us to be communicating in ways we cannot comprehend.
Or we are the first.
Or we are the last.
Or at some point in evolution the cost in resources, energy and time to continue exploring become to great and species just give up.
 

Kris_Musampa

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Its the sheer size of things that blows my mind...

Voyager 1 was launched in September 1977, it took 35 years to reach the outer limits of our own solar system, travelling at 40,000mph, arriving in 2012, where it passed into Interstellar Space, which is the space between solar systems.

Now, still travelling at 40,000mph, for Voyager 1 to reach the next solar system to ours, the Alpha Centauri system, will take over 30,000 years...
 

nimrod

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If earth was created by big bang? What triggered the bang? Answers pls
Google is your friend.

The universe began, scientists believe, with every speck of its energy jammed into a very tiny point. This extremely dense point exploded with unimaginable force, creating matter and propelling it outward to make the billions of galaxies of our vast universe. Astrophysicists dubbed this titanic explosion the Big Bang.

 

Manchester33

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Just run that last paragraph past me again ...
Lol, Fermi's paradox is 'Maths says that the universe should be teeming with life - so where is everyone?'.

The scientific response to that answer is that there must be a 'great filter'. Essentially, there's something stopping advanced life in the universe from progressing to a point where that particular civilisation becomes interstellar or even multi-planet. The three potential options are:

1 - The great filter is before us.

It's just incredibly, incredibly rare that life exists elsewhere (more like a 0.00000000000000000000000001% chance of live emerging and then evolving into something similar to Earth). Maybe life on Earth was formed by an asteroid colliding into us that left life-bearing material behind - and these particular asteroids are incredibly uncommon and require incredibly specific parameters to be effective in producing life.

2 - The great filter is ahead of us. (this is the theory I think is most likely to be accurate - which is quite depressing)

It's fairly common for life to reach human-level intelligence. But the vast majority of civilisations are wiped out before reaching interstellar travel. An example could be that it takes millions of years to reach interstellar travel, but cataclysmic events (asteroids, star expansion, supernovas, radiation - and tons of other things that could destroy civilisations) happen way more frequently, so these civilisations don't tend to reach interstellar space travel in time. Or perhaps the first civilisation is in complete control of the universe, and once a civilisation passes a landmark (speed of light tech developed) they swoop in a destroy them to prevent them from becoming a threat.

3 - There is no great filter, but there is some other, strange reason for the absence of alien civilisation evidence. For example:

a - It's physically impossible for anything other than light to travel at the speed of light.
b - The Earth is in an incredibly remote part of Space that no one has bothered to visit or colonise.
c - Alien civilisations are well aware of us, and we reside within a 'nature reserve' in space where they purposefully don't interact with primitive civilisations (that's very egotistical thought, they probably just simply don't care about us we aren't uncommon and can offer nothing to them).
d - Ant Colony Theory - Space is covered in evidence of life, but we simply don't/can't understand it, much like an ant-colony don't understand they're living under a human-made motorway.


Sorry for the long post - I just find it really, strangely interesting haha.
 

marcus

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Lol, Fermi's paradox is 'Maths says that the universe should be teeming with life - so where is everyone?'.

The scientific response to that answer is that there must be a 'great filter'. Essentially, there's something stopping advanced life in the universe from progressing to a point where that particular civilisation becomes interstellar or even multi-planet. The three potential options are:

1 - The great filter is before us.

It's just incredibly, incredibly rare that life exists elsewhere (more like a 0.00000000000000000000000001% chance of live emerging and then evolving into something similar to Earth). Maybe life on Earth was formed by an asteroid colliding into us that left life-bearing material behind - and these particular asteroids are incredibly uncommon and require incredibly specific parameters to be effective in producing life.

2 - The great filter is ahead of us. (this is the theory I think is most likely to be accurate - which is quite depressing)

It's fairly common for life to reach human-level intelligence. But the vast majority of civilisations are wiped out before reaching interstellar travel. An example could be that it takes millions of years to reach interstellar travel, but cataclysmic events (asteroids, star expansion, supernovas, radiation - and tons of other things that could destroy civilisations) happen way more frequently, so these civilisations don't tend to reach interstellar space travel in time. Or perhaps the first civilisation is in complete control of the universe, and once a civilisation passes a landmark (speed of light tech developed) they swoop in a destroy them to prevent them from becoming a threat.

3 - There is no great filter, but there is some other, strange reason for the absence of alien civilisation evidence. For example:

a - It's physically impossible for anything other than light to travel at the speed of light.
b - The Earth is in an incredibly remote part of Space that no one has bothered to visit or colonise.
c - Alien civilisations are well aware of us, and we reside within a 'nature reserve' in space where they purposefully don't interact with primitive civilisations (that's very egotistical thought, they probably just simply don't care about us we aren't uncommon and can offer nothing to them).
d - Ant Colony Theory - Space is covered in evidence of life, but we simply don't/can't understand it, much like an ant-colony don't understand they're living under a human-made motorway.


Sorry for the long post - I just find it really, strangely interesting haha.
Thats great. Really interesting. My brain wont accept that there ISNT life put there.

the ant anology was great
 

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