Retiring

Indaparkside

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 Dec 2015
Messages
9,743
If you are 43, loads of money unless you are planning to end it all by the time you are 63.
Now I may be talking bollocks and there are many more financially astute people on here than me, but if you had 1 million pounds, that’s £50k a year and in twenty years time the spending power will be like having only £25k which is nothing really.
To outstrip inflation you would need to invest in medium risk investments which fair enough you may win on but you could also loose, leaving you in your 60s with nothing.
It seems like a good idea but unless you are loaded, or have some serious assets you can liquidate if you need to it’s very risky and you will need to live like a monk.
Have you thought about just reducing your hours ? That way you can get a better work life balance but without the risk.

How dare you speak to bill gates like that:)
 

SWP's back

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 Jun 2009
Messages
79,450
If you are 43, loads of money unless you are planning to end it all by the time you are 63.
Now I may be talking bollocks and there are many more financially astute people on here than me, but if you had 1 million pounds, that’s £50k a year and in twenty years time the spending power will be like having only £25k which is nothing really.
To outstrip inflation you would need to invest in medium risk investments which fair enough you may win on but you could also loose, leaving you in your 60s with nothing.
It seems like a good idea but unless you are loaded, or have some serious assets you can liquidate if you need to it’s very risky and you will need to live like a monk.
Have you thought about just reducing your hours ? That way you can get a better work life balance but without the risk.
ETFs or multiasset portfolios aren’t risky on those timescales to be fair.
 

SWP's back

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 Jun 2009
Messages
79,450
God I hate acronyms, ETFs ??? Are they a bit like Unit trusts ?
Exchange traded funds.

Basically buying an index like the S&P500 or FTSE100 etc. Usually charge about 0.2% pa and historically you’re looking at 7-12% pa net growth per year over a 20 year time horizon (although some years they will drop by up to 40% as it’s an index).

Multiasset portfolios are less risking as they’d generally only have a 50% (ish) equity holding so would help insulate you from the worst of the markets (and vice versa).
 
Joined
21 Jul 2007
Messages
10
Thanks for advice will look into investments. I know there isn’t an site fire plan but was wondering on how others go about planning.
 

ChicagoBlue

Well-Known Member
Joined
10 Jan 2009
Messages
10,511
Work out what you need to live on, then times it by 20 and that’s approximately what you need to have in place.
Assuming a 5% payout is considered a little more aggressive over here, with 4% considered more realistic, with 3% considered even more conservative, if capital preservation is a major goal. Additionally, the cost of retirement is often more expensive in the first few years, as you start to do all those things you said you were going to do when you retired!

However, we also have some significant expenses that most in England don’t have, such as health care and property tax. Prudential suggests that a retired couple should have about $250,000 just for health care expenses!
 

Don't have an account?

Register now!
Top
  AdBlock Detected
Bluemoon relies on advertising to pay our hosting fees. Please support the site by disabling your ad blocking software to help keep the forum sustainable. Thanks.